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20121027
20121104
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CSPAN 25
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English 25
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
was a student body president there and a college quarterback. he got his start as a civil rights leader there. he was talking to students and reminding them of the sacrifices that their parents and grandparents made when the civil rights movements happened. in durham, he led a march of students to register to vote. they have sunday registration here in north carolina and early registration period there is a two-week period where you can actually vote. there is a two-week window where you can vote. later in the day, we had alicia keys, the singer and songwriter, who had about 1000 people in raleigh at a park edit for atomic late african-american neighborhood and was urging people to vote. in a suburb of raleigh, smithfield, in a tobacco warehouse which is a schumann this warehouse, we had about 5000 people show up to here pat mccrory, the republican for governor and chris christie. this is his third trip to the state. he has campaigned so often, he says he is thinking of moving here. he has campaigned for the republican ticket. host: i'm sure they would miss the governor dearly if he were to l
right on par with civil rights of the 1960's. let's end the drug wars. legalize marijuana now. [applause] let's repeal the patriot act. [cheers and applause] i would have never signed the national defense authorization act allowing for you and i as u.s. citizens to be arrested and detained without being charged. that's the reason we fought wars in this country. [cheers and applause] i promise to submit a balanced budget to congress in the year 2013. that is a 1.4 trillion reduction in federal spending. if we don't do this now, we are going to find ourselves in a monetary collapse and a monetary collapse very simply is when the dollars we have in our pockets don't buy a thing because of the acome anying inflation -- because of the accompanying inflation that goes along with every dollar we spend. thathe only candidate wants to eliminate income tax, eliminate corporate tax, abolish the i.r.s. and replace all of that with one federal consumption tax, the fair tax. i think it is the answer to our exports, it is the answer to american jobs. [applause] >> in what way way does the war on drugs
1964 civil rights act also prohibited employment discrimination on the basis of sex and that included pay. and basically the equal pay act hasn't been updated since then. so let's fast forward a minute to lily led better. the name that i know many of you are familiar with. and she had brought a lawsuit. she was in alabama working for almost 20 years at good yeer tire and rubber company. she learned from an anonymous note that that as one of very few women who held a particular position, she had been paid less than every other man in this position, including ones who were younger and had started way later on the job. she was disappointed and infuriated by the news. there was a policy that employees could not discuss pay amongst themselves, so she did not know until she got that an anonymous note. and when she learned about the years that she had been paid less, and the implications, because it may start small, but then when you think, over time, wage increases are often percentage increases of your salary. pension contributions are based on your salary. when you add a
. thousands of attorneys representing two major presidential candidates civil rights groups are in place policied to challenge electoral results that may be called in question by machine failures, voter suppression or other allegation of illegal activity. that is a story also in "u.s.a. today" taking a look at what happened in 2000 in florida and saying that possibly another state could be like florida in battleaybe ohio or other ground states where you could have a recount and not know who the winner of the election is. also front page of the "wall street journal" medicare complicates the senior vote. senior citizens are a coveted bloc in florida where three make bum a quarter of the electr elee and they are important to romney given the deficit among young voters and minorities. he needs not only to win among seniors but win big. in 2008 john phmccain captured e group by 8% margin but lost to president barack obama. mr. romney is leading among the elderly by 6% to 12% a sign he may be weathering a charge by democrats that he and ryan with undermine medicare. that is the "wall street jo
. >> rebuttal. >> education is a civil rights issue of our generation. we are making progress in delaware in terms of narrowing the achievement gap. as we do this we want to do it by raising the achievements of all students. that is what we are doing. i am more excited about what is or nonpublic schools in delaware that i have ever been. -- in public schools in delaware than i have ever been. we can first place to plant five years ago. it is one thing to win a competition, and now we are making progress. announced two months ago for the school year ending in june, 10,000 more kids proficient in reading. >> i just want you to speak to the racial part. >> we narrowed that achievement gap. >> i am interested in the gaps. >> the investments we are making will help african-americans, it is our significant commitment to early childhood education. over the next five years, we will improve the percentage of high needs kids enrolled in a quality preschool. that is a game changer. if you ever met a 5-year-old that is a couple years behind, is a tragedy. the most effective investment we can make as
says education is the civil rights issue of our generation. as we narrow the the achievement gap went to raise the expectations of students. my wife and nine went all the way through the schools here. i'm more excited today. we came in first place to a half years ago in race to the top. it is one thing to win a competition and we're implementing it. we announced two months ago that for the school year 10,000 more kids were proficient in math than the year before. >> i wanted to speak to the racial difference. >> the other investment we're making which will help african- american kids and -- is the significant commitment to the early childhood education. we will be increasing over the next five years the percentage of high needs kids who are involved in [indiscernible] there is evidence that shows the most effective economic development investment the state could make is in early childhood education. what we're saying is two things. the early childhood centers that were really good, it is not a financially responsible decision to -- we would have freincreasee reimbursement. they have t
. rosa parks took the upper seat in montgomery, alabama. it did not create the civil- rights movement. it was a courageous act, but public opinion had changed before that. and the reason we know that public opinion change first is because rosa parks did the same thing 12 years earlier and nothing happened. in between, african-american soldiers came back from world war ii, southerners came back north with a different set of views, but jackie robinson began to play major-league baseball. the political process caught up later and it took a catalyst to spark the change. right now we are in one of those moments where public opinion is ahead of the political leadership. >> importantly, what rick says about people walking into thoughts and ideologies is true, but on the other hand every poll shows that people want our elected officials to compromise and get things done. that is the message. >> i am accompanying ed miller, from texas. karl rove is single-handedly responsible for turning my mother into an armchair pollster. every other day she calls up and says -- french, obama is up by three.
years. a pbs series. he had come out on a series looking on civil-rights issues in america. that was a fundamental place for me to learn. i also worked on a documentary series for a long time. i learned by working in production and by immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to the best practices, the thing that happens in an institution where you are not just struggling to make the thing. you are talking about it and you also have community and resources. if you can afford it, that is a powerful route. i happened to learn the hardest way possible, which is by working in production and not doing anything else. >> is that an issue here, the kind of methods, the institutions and the pattern and career that allows people to be trained to do watch-dog type stuff, whether they are journalists or do similar things, are those drying up? >> documentary films are interesting. in some ways, that still exists. in journalism, the apprenticeship model the newspaper used to offer is definitely going away. you have a staff of 10 and you might be able to mento
for themselves and what straight couples have right now. host: so why not civil unions? >> it's a very different institution, it is a second class institution. civil unions are ok in some states. they were definitely part of the journey towards marriage. i have a great deal of respect for the states that passed those. but unfortunately the word marriage is the only word that is recognized in federal law approximately 1300 times. so when it comes down to protecting our families it is really only the institution of marriage the right to marry that will give us those protections. i will tell you we are on a journey here as americans continuously on a number of different issues. so we have to understand that we are looking to be treated as equal in the eyes of the law and equal in terms of the common human bonds that we share with all americans. and it is really only marriage that gets you that equal standing with my straight brother and sister. host: so what protections would be different under a marriage than civil unions? >> right now the federal government has a law in place called the defensive
guaranteeing civil rights and searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. it means choosing dialogue over blame. respect over division. hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and integrity, but it was his uncommon vision. he saw connections others did not see, like, the connection between political stability and hungry children. that vision became food for peace. and the mcgovern-adult education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962, he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term, he gave his first speech on the non. -- vietname. -- vietnam. 1970, he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels. in 1984, he urged all of our american leadership to understand the complexity, challenges, and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america would be a better place had george become president of the united states. [applause] that does not mean his campaign was a failure. far from it. the 1972 campaign open
of pennsylvania women. and has been appointed to the executive committee of the leadership conference on civil rights. she has authored many publications and articles including for u.s. a today and the "new york times." she has served as counsel in major litigation cases dealing with sex discrimination in schools, sexual harassment in the workplace, sex discrimination in intercollegiate athletic programs, and pay equity. among other issues. they say if you want a job well done, give it to a busy woman. and it gives me great pleasure to introduce to you a most accomplished and very busy woman. here to talk to us today about the importance of the women's vote and the 2012 election, the founder and copresident of the national women's law center marsha greenberger. >> well, thank you very much. thank you for that extraordinarily generous introduction. from the incomparable judy 11. and i have to tell you what a pleasure it is to be here and i must also confess to a personal relationship that i think had something to do with this invitation. the national women's law center has an incomparable ms. l
series. he had come out on a series looking on civil-rights issues in america. that was a fundamental place for me to learn. i also worked on a documentary series for a long time. i learned by working in production and by immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to the best practices, the thing that happens in an institution where you are not just struggling to make the thing. you are talking about it and you also have community and resources. if you can afford it, that is a powerful route. i happened to learn the hardest way possible, which is by working in production and not doing anything else. >> is that an issue here, the kind of methods, the institutions and the pattern and career that allows people to be trained to do watch-dog type stuff, whether they are journalists or do similar things, are those trying up? -- drying up? >> documentary films are interesting. in some ways, that still exists. in journalism, the apprentice ship model the newspaper used to offer is definitely going away. you have a staff of 10 and you might be able to mentor some nu
insider rights this a -- guest: the civil union issue, i think that is accurate, by the way. i have not see the civil union issue pop up in to the contras as of the average voter. on the margins, -- into the consciousness of the average voter. on the margins, it may pop up. although, it would traditionally break into the democratic party since they have been the sponsor of this type of legislation in the legislature. the predominant issue around the country is the economy. host: the bloomberg insider also reports -- guest: can we do a better job, absolutely. and we must do a better job for one to remain a relevant party on the national scene, and particularly in the west. the latino vote, the hispanic vote as we like to call that in the west, it had shifted toward the republicans under president and former colorado gov. bill once actually won the hispanic vote here in 2002. it began to slip away. we had some issues with one of our congressman, congressman tom tancredo pushed away some of those votes. of the active voting provision is about 16%. the -- the acting voting population is
together. i've come forward within my party to say that i believe that civil unions should be acceptable. we want to make sure they have these rights. i do believe marriage is between a man a woman. >> this create two classes of people. >> congressman dold, do you think you are reflected in your district. >> it is moderate. it's more fiscally conservative and socially moderate. >> i know the major of my district supports marriage equality. i know major of my district. mr.dold opposes that. >> the question from the chat, like presidential candidates mitt romney you have refused to release your tax returns. why is that. congressman dold, you believe that governor romney should release his turns? >> everything voters want to know about my financial position, what i've earned and owned and stock, bob and even our kids saving accounts are included on the report. what i said is my wife has her own career. she is a professional and she has competitors. she's not running for congress. my wife has a right to certain degree of privacy. >> your wife maybe entitled from privacy and but they've enti
't forget about that. we have to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities. for example he we have continued to make sure we have the right capability to respond to wildfires, hurricane relief, as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we have provide add broad range of essential services today to combatant commanders, that includes intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance for all the geographical combatant commanders. we provide air and missile defense for all the commanders. we provide logistical support for all the geographical combatant commanders. we provide signal communication support to all the geographical combatant commanders. these are key critical missions that people tend not to think about. as we go forward. so it's important that you understand that. we provide key for aviation, fires, information operation, civil affairs, military police, wmd defense capabilities. corps of engineers who are pretty busy today and doing many other things. we have critical components of the military space program. for example, we are responsible for everything from the sa
to be on health benefits. and i believe civil unions should be acceptable so they should have these rights. but this is between a man and woman. i believe two people that want to make that commitment it should be marriage. that's why the human rights campaign gave me their endorsement >> do you think it's a moderate district? >> it is a moderate district. i think it's more fiscally conservative and socially moderate. . >> i know the majority of my district supports marriage quality and employment non-discrimination act yet mr. dole opposes that. >> let's go to another question and the question is for mr. insider. >> why vnlt you released your tax return? >> the voters want to know what i've owned even our kids savings accounts are included with the report i filed. >> what do you pay in terms of tax rates? >> that's been reported in the papers as well. my wife has her own career. she has employees and clients and competitors. she's not running for congress. i believe my wife has a certain degree of privacy. everything voters want to know about my finances is in the report. >> they're entitl
to tolerate it and sort of equated it to the first amendment. that is never going to be my approach to civil liberties or equality. i am proud that we overturned don't ask, don't tell. and yes, marriage and equality is the right thing to do. >> rep wilson? >> the alpha lincolnville that you have sponsored, federal funding from schools, if there is believed in the schools, bullying for any reason is an unacceptable. i think that is best dealt with by teachers and parents and authorities, not by cutting funds from a school if there is bullying going on in the school. that is the position i take. like you, i am a parent. we do not need washington to solve those problems for us. >> rep? >> actually, when congress when wilson was in congress, she helped pass the no child left behind legislation, and it did just that. it took away power from our schools and put it into a one size fits all structure that does not teach new mexico kids. i would repeal the legislation. >> i'm going to do something a little different here, and give each of you a chance for one more were bottle on this issue, starting
is elected, we will go back to being barefoot and pregnant and the states or as they're going right now are going to start becoming small countries if power is given to them. and people in the south will see the rise again of us moving into the civil war type situation. host: before we talk to you we were talking about gender issues. do social issues whatever factor into voting there in wisconsin? guest: sure, like anywhere else they go into i think the way people line up in both parties and that's -- i don't know if it's any more true or less true in wisconsin than any other state host: california. our independent line. craig, you're on. caller: is this for me now? host: you're on, sir. go ahead. caller: i wasn't sure because you didn't list it properly. host: we're running out of time. go ahead. caller: i just want to mention because i think there's a problem with semantics in this country. and what i mean by that is everybody looks at romney from the standpoint as this man as a builder. he's not a builder he's a dismantler. and anybody that's familiar with construction fully realize
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)